Test video card and fix

test-video-card-and-fix-photo-4

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Have you tried turning it off and on again?

You can turn it off and on again. If that doesn’t work, take it to a professional. If you don’t have a friend or family member to help you, try calling the manufacturer.

If the screen still doesn’t work, take the system board out of the case.

If the screen still doesn’t work, take the system board out of the case.

To do this:

Test video card and fix photo 3
Test video card and fix photo 3

Some systems have a small screw behind the panel; remove that screw and then remove the panel.

To remove the panel, first, use a Phillips screwdriver to loosen the two screws in the back of your computer. Next, disconnect all cables from their connectors and lift off the top cover.

You can now access the video card if you need to adjust or replace it.

Some systems are held in place with screws or tabs. Remove those.

If you’ve tried turning on the system and it’s still not working, you may need to remove some of its components. Some plans are held in place with screws or tabs. Remove those. Then open up the panel covering your computer’s internals and look for any other screws or charges holding different parts of your system in place.

Test video card and fix photo 2
Test video card and fix photo 2

Some older models have a thin metal strip attached to the motherboard; this is called a heat sink and can be removed by sliding it off from both sides of your motherboard using needle-nose pliers (you could also use tweezers). You’ll want to keep this piece intact so that when you install new graphics cards later on down the road, they will fit correctly onto their respective slots without having any gaps between them—but if there’s room for improvement here now that we’re talking about removing stuff from our computers’ motherboards, then, by all means, go ahead and remove everything else before proceeding further into testing steps below!

Reconnect power and move the power supply cable to the back of the system board, ensuring that the connector is free to turn freely in its socket.

Reconnect power and move the power supply cable to the back of the system board, ensuring that the connector is free to turn freely in its socket.

If you’re using a power supply with single-phase or three-phase output (plugs into a wall outlet), ensure your graphics card has been properly installed. If it’s not, go through all steps as described above until you get your video card installed correctly.

Turn the power on again.

Turn the computer on and make sure it boots up.

Test video card and fix photo 1
Test video card and fix photo 1

Replace the video card if there is still no display.

If you still need to get a display, the first thing to check is the video card. If it’s not damaged, this may indicate a motherboard problem. If your computer doesn’t have a switch or button that allows you to turn off all power, try pressing F1 while powering up the laptop and see if there’s any change in behavior as compared to before upgrading your video card (if there isn’t one).

If you need a different option, then it’s likely that something else is wrong with your computer rather than just lousy hardware!

Try these steps to get your system working.

If the monitor still does not work, try these steps to get your system working.

Test video card and fix photo 0
Test video card and fix photo 0

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